HomeNews & FeaturesFeature StoriesArticle View
NEWS | Aug. 3, 2015

"The Imitation Game" Comes to the National Cryptologic Museum

The ENIGMA exhibit is one of the most popular at the National Cryptologic Museum (NCM) at Ft. Meade, Maryland, but few people know the true story behind the breaking of the ENIGMA code, a critical intelligence success in World War II. In an effort to entertain — and educate at the same time — the museum will provide two screenings of the hit movie, "The Imitation Game" (PG-13, 114 minutes), on Saturday, August 15, at 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. The movie portrays the life and work of Dr. Alan Turing at Bletchley Park in England during World War II. Dr. Turing led a team who developed the electro-mechanical "Bombe," which ultimately was used by the Allies to decode thousands of German messages enciphered on the ENIGMA.

The 2 p.m. screening will be followed by a panel discussion led by NSA Historians Dr. David Hatch and David Cooley, and NCM Education Coordinator Jennifer Wilcox. They will discuss the accuracy of the film and take questions from the audience about the actual events surrounding the life of Dr. Turing and his work on the Bombe.

No panel discussion will follow the 10:30 a.m. screening.

Both events are free for all who have a ticket. Tickets are available on a first come, first served basis, and can only be obtained at the NCM starting Monday, August 3, until the day of the event. Reservations will not be taken. There is a limit of four tickets per person, and due to the film's rating, attendees must be over the age of 13.

For more information about the movie screening, please call the NCM at 301-688-5849, or email crypto_museum@nsa.gov.

The National Cryptologic Museum is located at the intersection of Maryland Route 32 and the Baltimore-Washington Parkway (I-295), adjacent to the headquarters of the National Security Agency. For more information on the museum, tours, educational programs, and hours and days of operation, click on the National Cryptologic Museum tab at NSA.gov. Admission and parking are free. You can also follow the National Cryptologic Museum on Facebook at www.Facebook.com/NationalCryptologicMuseum.